Art

Art Gets Interactive: What’s New at the Esker Foundation Winter 2019

Story by Christina Wong. Be quiet. Watch your bags and your children. Don’t crowd the art and definitely do not touch the art. The various spoken and unspoken rules of visiting an art gallery are numerous. The reminders that these rules must be abided by—constant security, words of warning, velvet ropes—are also numerous, telling us that art is something that ought to be revered and respected.

Artist and illustrator Kyle Simmers: Communicating identity and relationships through their work

Story by Laurel McLean. As author Toni Morrison famously said: All good art is political. Paraphrasing this sentiment, Calgary-based artist and illustrator Kyle Simmers elaborates, “If you aren’t making work that is deliberately political, you’re just beautifying the status quo. I try to keep that in mind with all the things I’m working on; what would I like to see grow and change about our culture?”

Kelly Isaak: Finding the unique in everyone

Story by Andrew Bardsley. Photo by Liam Glass. Amid the dozens of rooms within the infamous Shamrock Hotel, a once popular yet rough spot, sits local artist Kelly Isaak. The hotel, closed in 2015, has been repurposed as the arts facility, NVRLND, where each of dingy, rough-and-tumble rooms now serve as art spaces for local artists – Isaak being one of them.

Keegan Starlight

Story by Andrea Wong. Photo by Elijah Beaver. When Keegan Starlight draws a portrait, the first thing he looks at are the eyes. He is methodical in familiarizing himself with the subject, often staring at a picture for weeks on end, until he reaches an understanding that he can pass on to someone else.

Cory Nespor

Story and photos by Will Geier. Cory Nespor is a visual artist known for his unique style, which incorporates text into visual pieces, as well as for his work with NVRLND, formerly Voltage Creative Garage, which houses Nespor’s iconic ‘Wake Me When I’m Famous’ sign.